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Thread: De-worming a turtle

  1. #1
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    De-worming a turtle

    My wood turtle has small, 3mm long white worms that show up in her feces. The only live foods i feed her are crickets & earthworms, both of which i get from a local bait shop. She has been fine until last week when i started to see the worms. Which is more likely to have caused the problem, the crickets or the earthworms? What`s the best place to order worm-free crickets and earthworms?
    Also, there are over-the-counter reptile dewormers available at the pet store, has anyone ever used these? Do they work?

  2. #2
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    It needs to go to a vet. Without you knowing which type of worms, you can`t effectively treat for them. Call your herp vet, and ask if you can just bring in a fecal sample for analysis. That will save you some $$ over an examination. BUT, I recommend doing the exam, too, so the vet can make sure nothing else is amiss..

  3. #3
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    I have no problems taking the turtle in for an exam, the thing is, we don`t have a herp vet. I can`t find a vet anywhere who specializes in reptiles, or even exotics for that matter. I have taken turtles to the vet before, it`s quite frustrating when they don`t know anything at all about them.

  4. #4
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    Bait shops often get earthworms that are raised in composted manure, which may be the source of the parasites.
    Try checking your local fish store. Some of them sell red wigglers worms (and possibly others) raised on clean material.
    Also, try www.kazarie.com as an on-line source of earthworms and red wigglers.

  5. #5
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    These sound like nematodes & at that size are very likely pin worms. Pin worms are believed to be spread by crickets. Treatment is with fenbendazole. It`s best to consult a vet to get the correct dosage for the animals weight. snake lady
    "Medicine to produce health has to examine disease" Plutarch http://community.webtv.net/SnakeladysFarm/SnakeLadysReptile0

  6. #6
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    Yes i took the turtle to the vet the other day and he said it was nematodes/cestodes and gave me some medicine to treat her. I have already ordered crickets online to feed her, that should be parasite-free.

  7. #7
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    Re:De-worming a turtle

    Cestodes (tapeworms) are rarely seen in their entirety. Usually the eggs are passed in small worm segments that look like grains of rice when dried. Cestodes can reach enormous lengths & steal much of the reptiles food nutrition. I recently treated an adult boa with a 35+ foot tapeworm! Pin worms (nematodes) can be present in massive amounts on fecal floats but are not extremely harmful to their host. On the other hand cestode infections must be taken seriously. Many vets that treat primarily mammals recommend just one treatment with Droncit for cestodes. While this is appropriate treatment with mammals a single treatment is not appropriate for reptiles. Cestodes are rarely a problem in captive collections as an intermediate host is required. Nematodes don`t require an intermediate host & can be passed directly to other reptiles or infest the original reptile if sanitary conditions are poor. Enough reptile parasites 101 for today:^) snake lady
    "Medicine to produce health has to examine disease" Plutarch http://community.webtv.net/SnakeladysFarm/SnakeLadysReptile0

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